“Social connection is the breadth, the depth, and the meaning in your social relationships. It’s actually the greatest predictor of long-term happiness.” — Shawn Achor

The social connections we make in our lives drive our happiness — at home and at work.

We rarely associate our workplaces with cultivating friendships and relationships — but it can be one of the key drivers of happiness, productivity, and overall well-being.

In this 9-minute video, Vishen Lakhiani shares key ideas, based on scientific research, that show how simple shifts you can make in your company culture can boost productivity, happiness, and surprisingly bring massive increases in revenue.

Vishen also brings on a guest speaker, Shawn Achor, the famous Harvard psychologist behind The Happiness Advantage.

Some ideas shared in this video: 

  • (00:56)  — The surprising importance of having a best friend at work.
  • (01:45) — The stunning set of characteristics that cause certain people in companies to be 40% more likely for a raise.
  • (03:54) — The simple 2-minute daily exercise that led one large corporation to see a 50% increase in revenue, massive improvements in productivity, and a culture so strong that Google flew down to investigate them.

Watch the video above to learn more and discover why it’s so important to create teams, companies, and even schools, that unite us as human beings and speak to our biologically-driven need to connect with others.


Traditional goal-setting is dangerous. Extraordinary By Design unveils a fundamentally new way to think about your work, your social connections and your goals.

When you look at your goals as tools to get the experiences that make you happy, grow rapidly, and contribute to the world — you can then break your life down into 12 distinct areas.

These 12 areas are so interconnected that when one is lacking, it will pull down the others. But when you elevate one, it with elevate your entire life.

This is how you become Extraordinary By Design.

extraordinary-by-design

How strong are your social connections at work? Share your thoughts in the comments below.

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